Rose City Exclusive Presentation!

We are so very pleased to announce that world famous travel photographer, Robert Holmes will be live at the 4th Annual Rose City PhotoFair on August 24th. His presentation details will be announced in the next few weeks, so be sure to check back here for more information. In the meantime here is his bio information:

The entraance to Swezigon Pagoda, Bagan, Myanmar

Robert Holmes career as one of the world’s most successful and prolific travel photographers has extended over 40 years. He was the first photographer to be honored twice by the Society of American Travel Writers with their Travel Photographer of the Year Award and he is the only photographer to be given the award 5 times, most recently for 2017.

In 2015 he won both first and second place in the international Errazuiz Wine Photographer of the Year competition.  He was the Errazuiz Wine Photographer of the Year for 2016 and also Marks&Spencer Food Photographer of the Year for 2016 in addition to gaining 3 additional awards.  This is unprecedented.

He has worked for National Geographic, Geo, Saveur, Wine Spectator, Life, Time and hundreds of other major magazines and international companies. His stock catalog of over half-a-million images is represented for licensing by Getty.

His assignments have taken him from coverage of the 1975 British Everest Expedition for the London Daily Mail and Paris Match to searching for snow leopards in the remote valleys of western Nepal for National Geographic Magazine, trekking into the rain forests of Borneo with Penan tribesmen for Islands Magazine and crossing the Great Indian Desert on camel for Departures.

Climbing in Canada’s Bugaboos, British Columbia with Canadian Mountain Holidays

Bob has illustrated over 45 books and he has regularly been one of the elite group of the world’s 100 best photojournalists invited to participate in the acclaimed “Day in the Life” series.  He authored and photographed The Traveler’s Wine Guide to California that won a prestigious lowell Thomas Award.

His passion for food and wine has lead to extensive work in those industries including the illustration of 9 books on wine and 7 cookbooks. More recently Bob has added film production to his talents and in partnership with Andrea Johnson has been producing videos for clients in the wine and hospitality industries.

Bob is a Fellow of both the Royal Geographical Society and The Explorers Club.

Check out the Latest on ‘Couv’ Camera

Last year I had PhotoFair regular John Chu convert an original EOS M into infrared for me. The old original M cameras are quite reasonable on the used market and frankly it makes for a great conversion. The original M cameras converted to IR shouldn’t be more than $300-$350 and it has a decent 18mp sensor and it is AF. There are others as well, I routimely see IR converted older Canons and Nikons with 18mp sensors and often these are in the $200-$300 range. I did the 650nm conversion on mine and can use heavier filters for the wide range of IR options. Although the color work with infrared is kind of fun what with all the wacky colors, I really like the classic black and white infrared look as well as using the color infrared and pulling back 90% of the color for a subtle quasi black and white look.

The images below were taken with the camera and no IR filter. Just the 650nm infrared sensor conversion. Without any filter or Photoshop work there is this demonic looking orange hue over everything. That can be great when you want to create a post apocalyptic sense to a scene, but not so much useful for other applications. You can use Photoshop to flip the red and blue values with the channel mixer and create crazy neon blue skies instead of the ominous demon sky effect. Just search you tube and you will find a few short videos about how to do this. The third image is monochrome with all the color taken out. Click here to continue reading…

Little Canon G7X delivers BIG results

From ‘Couv’ Camera blog…

Last month at PhotoFair in Newark, CA I managed to come home with more cool stuff. I bought a Voightländer Ultron 28/2 in Leica M Mount. I bought a beat up old FD 200/2.8 IF to play with , and I bought a Canon G7x Mark II. Then as if that were not enough, I wandered into Pro Photo Supply in Portland and they had a used Canon RF 35/1.8 IS. Since I didn’t have a single native lens for my EOS R I figured, yeah, gotta have that. But I wasn’t finished, I took the long way home through St Johns in North Portland and said hello to the gang at Blue Moon Camera and they had a LensBaby Velvet 56/1.6 used. Holy cow, this is getting out of hand.

The Velvet 56mm is Lensbaby’s take on soft focus, I love soft focus lenses, but I have hit you all up a little heavy on the soft side of imaging, so I’ll refrain for now, and write that up later in the year. I’ll say the RF 35 is outstanding, love that lens but I’ll be yacking it up another day.

Today I want to talk about the Canon G7X Mark II. I have liked this camera since Canon first introduced the Mark I way back in 2014. Some of you may remember I wrote up the Canon S110 a few …

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